Soy and Health


Public Awareness:

  • Awareness of the health benefits of soy foods rose significantly in 2002, with 74% of Americans perceiving soy as healthy, compared to 69% in 2001.
    (United Soybean Board Report, "Consumer Attitudes About Nutrition," 2002)
  • Fewer then one in 10 Americans perceive any negative health effects of soy or soy foods. (United Soybean Board Report, "Consumer Attitudes About Nutrition," 2002)

Heart Health:

  • The FDA recommends 25 grams a day of soy protein as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. Foods that contain 6.25 grams of soy protein meet the FDA standards for "Heart Healthy" labeling. (FDA Talk Paper, 10/20/99)
  • Soy contains anti-oxidants (isoflavones or phytonutrients) which decrease low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL - the ‘bad’ cholesterol). (Asia Pac J Clin Nutr, 10, 3:204-11, 2001)
  • Soy’s isoflavones--particularly genistein and daidzein- improve high-density lipoprotein (HDL-the ‘good’ cholesterol) levels and have been shown to protect the heart health of postmenopausal women. (J Nutr, 131, 4:1202-6, 2001)

Cancer:

  • Most research supports that soy is a cancer fighting food. The phytonutrients, or phytoestrogens, in soy can play a preventative role in certain breast cancer progression and prostate cancer cell reproduction. (Soylutions Newsletter, March 2002)

Weight Management and Diabetes:

  • Soy contains fiber that promotes fullness and aids in elimination. (Soylutions Newsletter, March 2002)
  • Soy is speculated to balance blood sugar levels. (Soylutions Newsletter, March 2002)
  • Because soy is known to be a low-glycemic food, it also prevents the elevation of blood glucose levels and large insulin secretions. Blood glucose stimulates insulin, the hormone responsible for storing sugar and fat in the cells. (Soylutions Newsletter, March 2002)

Osteoporosis:

  • A number of studies have demonstrated the positive role soy plays in bone building and bone density preservation. (Soylutions Newsletter, March 2002)